Advertisements

Evenstar

Scuderia Farce

Angry bird rant incoming

Like I’ve always said, it’s a rollercoaster being a Kimi supporter. Not even a pole position after nine years, can be celebrated long enough before we’re thrown deep down into the depths of sadness, but this dip wasn’t like the others, this was… betrayal. And never before in his entire career has it been so evidently clear on the Iceman’s face.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Ferrari could’ve easily still achieved a 1-2 result with Kimi winning and Vettel in second at Monaco. So the idea that they did it for the best interests of the team and Kimi is being a sore loser is just plain wrong. They did it for the best interests of Vettel. It’s not illegal, so why not. A few sorry faces won’t cost them compared to the revenue they’ll make with another potential seven time world champion like Schumacher in the making. Actually, Kimi has a huge following and judging by the reaction of fans, even non-Kimi fans, on all the Scuderia’s social media, it might cost them a lot more than they thought.

As this article explains very clearly how Kimi was robbed of a victory, contrary to the excuses other sites and figures, even the official F1 media, which are trying to convince fans to save face of their sport being under controversial criticism. Vettel even lied about Bottas’ lap-time, trying to justify the over-cut being a response to a threat from Mercedes and RedBull. The only over-cut they were trying to do was to their own world champion, Kimi. He looked ready to give someone an uppercut after the race.

Blind folk will tell you to “look at the lap times”. Ok, yes I’ve seen them, what’s your point? “Kimi was slow and Vettel was faster, end of!” No he wasn’t that slow, even before pitting, he was simply left in the dark unlike Vettel who was told when to push and when he was pitting, Vettel wasn’t exactly flying before Kimi pitted either. Kimi was suddenly called in to pit with no warning and he was released into traffic which cost him the win. Look how close he and Vettel were once they met after the pits. Kimi could’ve easily been ahead without the order to release him into traffic which made him almost a whole lap disadvantaged. It’s one of those moronic situations where the truth is clear but people are so dumb to see it they need to trust F1’s spokepersons (hypocritical teambosses too) to defend Ferrari, luckily majority of us fans aren’t so stupid. Yes Vettel was faster but the question is how and why. How? He was in clear air and Kimi was in traffic. Why? Because Ferrari wanted it that way.

Here is another report on the race which explains why Kimi was pitted the way he was, highlighting he was actually slow (yet Kimi said nothing was wrong and the car felt good) that it almost jeopardised Ferrari’s 1-2. Really?

He has been with them since 2014, and 3 years before that. Couldn’t they have honoured his services with a win in Monaco? It’s not like he was losing dramatic pace or made mistakes or had no chance. This isn’t about not accepting defeat, this is about unfair treatment. And if they didn’t fail Kimi, why would his engineer and side of the garage be angry too as reported by Toni Vilander?

Vettel makes out they are friends, and on Kimi’s part they probably are, but I never trusted Vettel and knew he would be crafty on track as he has previously shown in his career with “Multi 21” and what not. I don’t wanna get anymore personal but the way Vettel celebrated in Monaco whilst absolutely aware Kimi is not happy reduced my views of him even more. He prodded Kimi to shake his hand, what kind of winner goes seeking gratification like that? Then later says to the media he “heard” Kimi is upset, as if he didn’t see it for himself.

As Mark Hughes writes:

“My guess is that they had not told Kimi until after qualifying on pole that the plan was to give Vettel the overcut. That they have never specifically told him that he is there to be number two. And that he will have assumed therefore if he was faster he’d get the chance to win. This tallies exactly with how Massa was told about Alonso having priority (except in that case it was even worse as he only found out in the race itself). In the Alonso case, the agreement that he would have priority was made immediately post-Melbourne but no-one told Massa about it until mid-race Germany! I guess Kimi got into the car with the argument still unresolved. No driver wants to believe he is there to be number two even if he delivers pole. And my guess is they told him that was the case and he resolved to try to win the race anyway. Obviously the best way would’ve been to have done it on pure pace and got so far ahead that the pit strategy became irrelevant. But he didn’t have the speed advantage to be able to do that. So he chose the only other way left – and it almost worked. The anger would’ve been compounded by them bringing him on on a lap that was guaranteed to give him traffic on his out-lap.”

Not all of us understand what happened after Kimi clinched the title in 2007. Some of you may have read about the Santander deal which ousted Kimi for Fernando Alonso. But few of us know for certain, that something was not quite right and has not been ever since, despite Kimi’s return to Ferrari in 2014.

Since Michael Schumacher announced his retirement from F1 in 2006, that itself being forced by hand of then Ferrari boss Luca Di Montezemolo, the Scuderia needed a fitting replacement, the heir to the King, albeit a temporary one. The fastest guy around was Kimi Raikkonen who was falling out of love and patience with McLaren after suffering poor unreliability for 5 years, winning no championship with the team but built an impressive status nonetheless, narrowingly missing out on the 2003 and 2005 championships down to car failures. Apparently Ferrari jumped in and signed Kimi at the end of the 2005 season.

Everyone knew the quiet, mono-toned apolitical Finn was an odd match for the political Red outfit. Many of his fans, including myself, cringed at the idea. And for good reason. Plus, they had another Spanish driver in mind to fill Schumacher’s legacy, one who was more suited to the Latin image of Ferrari.

It was a matter of business and keeping friends close, but your enemies closer. Kimi Raikkonen, claimed by Sir Stirling Moss as “quite frankly the fastest driver in the world” was a threat to Ferrari and any other competitor. Why don’t they just embrace Kimi then, you’ll ask? Well, it’s a matter of personal taste, and those in control either love or hate Kimi. Whichever way, he doesn’t give a shit. Neither do I if anyone thinks I’m crazy.

Ferrari pretty much instantly dumped Kimi, their world champion, no more than four races into the 2008 season. As the Santander article explains, Kimi was at his peak and achieved in his opinion the most perfect hat-trick weekend, scoring pole position, fastest lap and victory at the Spanish Grand Prix. After that it went downhill to money and business. Instead of Kimi fighting for the championship, which he was leading by the way, teammate Felipe Massa was pushed to the fore to take glory, missing out on the title in dramatic fashion in Brazil to Lewis Hamilton. Actions do speak louder than words, like Kimi’s 10 fastest laps record that season, so pace and performance wasn’t a factor. Even whilst Kimi was struggling in 2007 adjusting to a new team, new car, new tyres, he was fighting on fair ground because Massa won a few races too that year. Kimi was never, ever, hired to be Ferrari’s No.1 driver. And I’m glad, because he’s better than that. You just have to look at how long Massa was in that “top” team yet never became champion. That’s because he was the perfect no.2 for Schumacher and then another driver, Alonso. Of course Massa even did his duty on his home race, Brazil, for Kimi to win the 2007 title by one point. Massa wasn’t good enough to be their No.1 driver so they needed Kimi to win in 2007 and he got the job done.

The following year, in 2009, Kimi knew he was on his way out. He knew he was done by a business deal. But the comments surrounding his motivation and character made it even worse. It had absolutely nothing to do with motivation or his lifestyle. Kimi was going through a lot of difficulty personally that time too, but he never let it affect his job. You only have to compare his performances in the poor F60 to Massa’s. After Massa’s awful injury at the Hungarian GP which put him out for the rest of the season, Kimi suddenly had all the focus and attention and support and *surprise surprise* achieved better results, he even made the donkey wagon win at Spa-Francorchamps in a heroic style, which is my all-time favourite victory of his at the Scuderia because it was purely him. His mechanics and engineers were astounded by his achievement.

But the whole scenario at Ferrari disheartened him so much, the Iceman actually left F1. That’s how bad it was.

He forgave them after his return to F1 with Lotus. But that’s only because he’s a decent man. He felt so strongly about 2007 and his dream coming true, the joy, the happiness, he still considers the Scuderia his “family”, but this emotional connection clouded his judgement. I’m sorry to say this but Kimi made a huge mistake returning to Ferrari. When it was announced, on my birthday of all days in 2013, I wasn’t happy at all. I knew exactly what would ensue. I don’t know why his manager Steve Robertson agreed to it, but he is a manager after-all and wants to ensure he gets the best deal available for his driver. Kimi’s return to F1 with Lotus was such a great comeback, but as always on this rollercoaster of a ride, it ended bittersweet. Financial issues and no salary, and harsh behaviour from certain team members, gave Kimi no choice but to leave.

The only reason Ferrari re-hired Kimi, in my opinion, is because of his experience and popularity and they needed a stable yet extremely committed second driver who could pick up the pieces should the other driver be out of contention. The massive appeal Kimi has globally is of great marketing value to the brand. But like the reason they first hired him for 2007, they simply needed a No.2 for the great Vettel who was coming onboard.

Ferrari were getting nowhere with their marriage with Alonso no matter how much money they pumped into it. That bubble burst and ended in divorce. Karma for ruining Kimi’s career, maybe. But Kimi rejoining the team to be Alonso’s No.2, seriously? Didn’t he or Robertson see that one coming? Maybe they did and just accepted it till Alonso left the team a year later and things would be equal again with a new driver? What else could explain this?

What is the true story Kimi? Was he just implying there’s car issues and problem solving practices in question or that he knows his position in the team? I think the latter is unlikely, due to this team radio:

“Yes, but who is making the calls? In one of those, I mean it seems to me at least we are not…. We seem to be getting second choice all the time. So, I wanna know what the hell is going on”.

Still wondering what the hell is going on? That was two years ago Kimi. It had to take achieving pole position after nine years (which by the way the team knew they could over-cut Kimi in the race to let Vettel win), to realise you’re being treated unfairly?

This suggests to me there is no written agreement or clause in the contracts to suggest driver favouritism, otherwise why would Kimi be questioning like this? He would know about it and settle for it or leave. Him settling for it obviously unhappy and complaining shows he does not know about it.

This is Ferrari.

They have cheated Kimi, betrayed his trust and played with his emotions. Heck, Kimi even invited Maurizio Arrivabene and his wife, who is Kimi’s team PR woman, to his wedding last year. This same man who, after Kimi’s excellent pole in Monaco, says “the champion is coming out sometimes“. Maybe because you Mafia guys have shackled him? He said it was “a pity” for Vettel’s lap, why? He locked out the front row with Kimi, what’s so bad? Ah..yes… he’s not the one infront.

Few races earlier this year (and numerous races before since 2015), this is what they do to Kimi in the race when he is ahead of Vettel or threatens his position and then have the nerve to verbally abuse him to media for “doing nothing“?!

“Today Kimi seemed to have other commitments. I talked to Maurizio, maybe it’s time I sit with him and talk to him.
“He seemed to be doing nothing on the track.”- Marchionne, Chinese Grand Prix 2017

So they’ve openly criticised him to the media in only the second race of the year? Claiming he always starts seasons on slow form and gets better? Maybe with Ferrari but he surely didn’t at Lotus after two years away from the sport.

Oh look, Arrivabene says it’s too early to start favouring a driver for the championship, what a lie!

And the sixth race in Monaco isn’t too early either? Why don’t you just admit you’ve handicapped Kimi since the start of the season and every other season to create such a large deficit between him and Vettel in points to justify your team orders to support him for the title? Oh wait, you can’t because you’re fooling him!

In the 2016 season, Ferrari didn’t win a single race, but they still messed about with Kimi. He and Vettel were on very similar pace since Australia, with Kimi outqualifying Vettel that season 11-10 and collecting a handful of podiums, with the odd exception of finishing ahead of Vettel at Spain in 2nd. With mixed fortunes for Vettel on track, Kimi was ahead in the WDC on a few ocassions, after the Russian, British, Malaysian GPs. Kimi was consistently out-qualifying Vettel towards the end of 2016, but with strange strategies and DNFs resulting in finishing behind the German on Sundays and in the championship.

In the 2015 season, as teammates for the first time, Kimi was on par with Vettel’s pace from the start. as James Allison stated Kimi making Vettel sweat. But Ferrari needed their No.1 to bring the team to glory, not the dude who won their last driver’s and constructors championships and suffered with them in 2014 and helped develop the car. In Australia, Vettel showed his class as he pushed Kimi wide into T1 on the first lap.

Malaysia 2015 was a clear indication to me that Kimi’s return to Red was indeed a mistake as Vettel took the team’s first win since Alonso. But I, like Kimi, persevered to watch this joke of a team, thinking he can win at some point without any issues like lack of engine power, electrical issues, clutch issues or poor pitstops and strategies again. Just look how dejected Kimi was after seeing the new boy take the fruits of hardwork Kimi actually made:

Then came Italy 2015, Vettel and Kimi qualified on the front row and Kimi’s car stalled on the start becoming dead last on the grid. That was the last straw for me, and that’s why I quit KRS on this blog since then. It was clear tampering with Kimi’s car to ensure Vettel gets the Italian podium for the Tifosi as the team’s higher paid driver and German Schumacher duplicate. Mercedes owned that year so Ferrari knew they couldn’t win at Monza, Hamilton did, so only one of their drivers could be on the podium so why not their No.1?

“Ah… maybe one day”

… what? Win one day? At Ferrari? That day has come and gone my dear. And it came again, to hurt like a knife in the back, last Sunday in Monaco. I don’t know, maybe he was just so deflated from not having won a race since 2013 and 12 years since winning there. Maybe he was extra invested in it emotionally since becoming a dad again to a baby girl and wants to make family proud. I’d like to think it was just those sentimental reasons, but as his despondent demeanor showed it clearly it wasn’t. I wish he would walk away from this “team” and find contentment elsewhere, whether it be in F1 or another sport or spending time with his real family.

Kimi considers Ferrari his family, well, they’re not, they’re your employers and colleagues, you should never mix business with pleasure. Now all I can hope is he has had words with the team and actually doesn’t get swayed by their fake reassurance and lies again and just leaves, it’s not like he can threaten to quit if they “do it” again as it’s never as clear cut as it was in Monaco’s race, sometimes their poor tactics are so subliminal that’s why Kimi is in this situation of utter perplex.

I’ll carry on supporting him as long as he races and hopefully will see him at Monza in September for the Grand Farce. Oops sorry. Prix. I meant Grand Prix…

– Evenstar

Advertisements

Female 1? Evenstar and KRS

A huge thank you to Dev for creating this article on KRS and Kimi for whatsuplife.in!


Where does the Female fan stand today in the lofty world of Formula One?

by Devdeep Tyagi

It isn’t extremely difficult to understand the space occupied in popular racing culture by the Female fan of Formula one? If you are game for intelligent observations, then you may well find that though the iconic Motorsport world of Formula One has gained lofty acceptance in this part of Asia, it continues to be widely popular and well received where it emerged first: the West, especially in Europe.

KRS-Calendar-2014When you speak of Formula One racing circuits and the featured events in every calendar year, do not be surprised that European race tracks come to fill a staggering one half of the entire F1 contest. Do females stand a chance of acceptance or not. The sport, after all is largely or very completely a male dominated one!

To a great degree, the female fans haven’t got their due. Despite being present in large numbers in Hungaroring (Hungarian race circuit in Budapest), at the Yas Marina at Abu Dhabi and the part dangerous and part adrenaline pumping domain of Nurburgring or Hockenheim, both located at Germany, one hasn’t given women supporters of f1 their due share of respect.

To understand Formula One’s intricate and dynamic existence it isn’t enough to note the pulse of the action with importance just being accorded to its racing stars. Race drivers are to teams what an isolated sparkling twinkle of a star is to a wide galaxy. Therefore in the galaxy of Formula One, everyone ranging from the race driver, the team engineer, the race engineering crew, the mechanics who painfully change car gears during a pit halt including the engineering entourage of car designers and technical experts, the communication experts and the team’s principal are together responsible for the action. The driver ultimately oozes action and adventure to a script jointly unfurled by genius thinkers.

But that is not all. If there would be no fans then who will the teams compete for and drivers race. As one bright girl tell me, “Undoubtedly, it is for the fans. But, fans of Formula One aren’t a lousy bunch who come to stoke their adventure hungry pallets with mindless action. Fans today wish to be as well informed as the team and its owners”.

This bright soul I was happy speaking to further shared, ” fans need Statistics, information, comparisons, race analysis, interviews and action that churns out from either a practice session or the events on the main race day”. I was further told, ” Today’s Formula One fans are hungry for real action and starving for information in most minute constructs”. As I began to sink in such intelligent observations, I was drawn to the mind of this sharp observer of F1.

As told to me, ” I am a young Formula One die hard follower, someone who clinically bridges the gap between the fan’s demands of the motorsport and its favorite idols and the need for constant F1 related information“. She further added, “you cannot possibly muster all that there is to know about the present 10 contesting teams, but through the progress of 1 particular race driver, you may well go on to record tremendous information that buffers the hungry information consuming stock of an intelligent fan”.

I couldn’t agree more with this observation.

kimi-2012-comeback-win-wallpaper”Kimi Raikkonen Space is enjoying its 10th anniversary in 2015 having being brought to life in 2005″, she further added”, and from what was told to me turned out to be an impressive account of one girls’ mad pursuit of her favorite sport. (more…)


From The KRS Archive: Belgium 2009

Ferrari's Finnish driver Kimi Raikkonen stands on the podium of the Spa-Francorchamps Circuit on August 30, 2009 in Francorchamps, after the Formula One Belgian Grand Prix. Ferrari's Finnish driver Kimi Raikkonen won the race ahead of Force India's Italian driver Giancarlo Fisichella and Red Bull's German driver Sebastian Vettel.               AFP PHOTO / JOHN THYS (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s a loooong four week break till F1 is back and we return to Spa-Francorchamps, dubbed as the Holy Ground of Kimi Raikkonen amongst his army of fans.

Somehow, even when I was slightly relieved to have this long break away from F1 for a while especially after the bullshit Kimi is going through, you still look forward to the next race. Like any typical F1 fan, withdrawal symptoms start almost immediately and it’s only 3 days after the emotional, crazy and massively disappointing (for Kimi, duh) Hungarian GP; I was bored and got watching some of his old races; Britain 2008 (remarkably similar to this year’s GP), Belgium 2008 (heartbreaking, I don’t think I could personally continue blogging if this year’s race goes wrong as well).

Then to get back to high spirits, I chose to watch his last victory for Scuderia Ferrari, his win from 6th on the grid, at Spa 2009. The opening lap…It just gave me chiils, y’know? The Iceman is just…another level of speed. Even in a dog car. But F1 isn’t that simple nowadays and Kimi, though a world champion in one of the last real fast F1 cars of it’s era in 2007, is affected by these new F1 cars perhaps more so than the others but it’s not right to say he is slow or lacking motivation (seriously, again?). It’s a natural God given talent, you’re born with it, it doesn’t disappear. So screw you haters and journalists who have nothing better to do that to disrespect a world class driver and dedicated sportsman who’s going through a phase of extreme bad luck again this year.

Alas, back to Spa; we really need to see you on the podium again Kimi – we miss you up there and it’s just not right that Vettel takes all the glory for Ferrari. This victory was special and so special infact, sacred almost… as it is still his last with Ferrari, despite his teammate taking two wins with the team this season. I felt like sharing it with all the fans again…

Video SoundTracks: “Finished Symphony” – Hybrid | “Marine” – Aliens VS Predator videogame | “Lifeless” – Seventh | “Greece 2000” – Three Drives | “Out of the Blue” – System F (Ferry Corsten) | “Go” – Andy Hunter | “Oceanic” – Above & Beyond (Super8 & Tab remix) | “The Day After Tomorrow” – Harald Kloser


During the next few weeks, I’ll try my best to keep the site updated and entertaining 🙂 Perhaps even edit a new video maybe…

Evenstar Saima x


Goodbye Jules…

Jules and Kimi, Hungarian GP 2014

Jules and Kimi, Hungarian GP 2014

Writing this straight from the heart, no planning, just… feel like sharing. It was on Eid last Friday/Saturday when I first woke, checked my phone and saw the news about Jules. It was very tough to enjoy that day without a constant numb feeling inside and even the days after.

Bianchi’s passing is the first fatality in Formula One that I’ve seen and been actively aware of. I was too young to know the feeling when the last death of Ayrton Senna happened 21 years ago. Nine months previously to 17th July 2015, when Jules’ accident took place it felt real. But having not seen him since, whilst being in hospital care, it’s harder to accept he has now died. You’d always hope for some good news as long as there is a chance. I still can’t believe what’s happened…

Motorsport and Kimi have been part of my life since I was 12 and now I’m almost 28; time goes too quickly, we take things for granted and even those we support and love to watch on track. But it is with our hearts that we see rightly, things mostly unspoken but felt. And no matter which driver we support, they are ALL our heroes and we come together to show it (there was a #DressForJules initiative created by other fans). That’s the motorsport community. We feel honoured to witness these great, fearless, talented drivers who risk it all for the passion they have for speed, to win, to succeed. They know F1 is a dangerous sport but that doesn’t stop them.

I didn’t know Jules, or follow him closely as much I do with Kimi obviously (I always voted Jules the most handsome F1 driver without a second thought, he truly was as beautiful as talented) but when any racing driver suffers a serious accident (even outside the sport, we remember Schumacher and ask him to #KeepFightingMichael…), the pain is close to home. Afterall, it could’ve been any one of them. His accident was terribly unfortunate, however it was instant with minimum physical pain, I hope. In the brief time that Jules spent with the F1 world and outside, it’s easy to see he made an impression that will last forever in the hearts of those who saw him and that smile… 

As we approach Hungary, the first GP weekend after his passing, I wanted to give my deepest and sincere condolences to Bianchi’s family, friends and collegues, all who without a doubt will be in our thoughts this difficult weekend.

Keep Flying Jules… wherever you are.

¬ Evenstar Saima

#7 and #17, Kimi and Jules, Hungarian GP 2014

#7 and #17, Kimi and Jules, Hungarian GP 2014