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Video: What makes driving exciting for Kimi

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Shell Motorsport released this rather relaxed video of Kimi Raikkonen giving his view on what driving means to him…

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Raikkonen brushes off Silverstone crash criticism

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Kimi Raikkonen has hit back after critics called on him to be banned for his British Grand Prix crash.

The Finn has recovered from a bruised ankle, knee and ribs after the 47G crash at Silverstone, in which Felipe Massa was also involved and Max Chilton’s head narrowly avoided a flying tyre.

“Why does he come in balls out like that and crash?” F1 legend Niki Lauda had said at Silverstone, referring to the way in which Raikkonen rejoined the circuit after running wide.

Jo Ramirez, the former McLaren team manager, said Raikkonen’s driving was “ludicrous”.

“He could have seriously hurt himself,” the Mexican told motorline.cc, “or worse, he could have hurt Massa as well. And yet he gets away without any punishment.

“I thought Derek Warwick was the steward so I wrote to him, but it was Nigel Mansell. But Warwick replied to me ‘You’re right! Raikkonen should have been punished!'” Ramirez revealed.

“If it would have been Maldonado or Grosjean, they would have sat out Germany, for sure,” he charged.

At Hockenheim, however, Raikkonen dismissed his critics, telling the Finnish broadcaster MTV3 that punishments are not necessary “every time a driver goes off the track”.

“Of course, everyone can have their opinion,” said the Finn, “but usually it’s people who have never driven who are the first to say someone should be punished.”

(Source: MTV3, via motorsport.com)


 

Kimi: Penalty for crashing on your own…? A joke


Video: Raikkonen vs. Alonso in Karting Showdown

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Fernando Alonso, Kimi Raikkonen, Jules Bianchi, Marc Gene and Raffaele Marciello join forces with the media in Germany for a Santander-sponsored karting showdown!

Scuderia Ferrari’s sponsor for the past five seasons, Santander Bank, organised a karting event tonight at a track in Walldorf, a few kilometres from the Hockenheimring, home to this weekend’s German Grand Prix. Winners of the event were Scuderia test driver Marc Gene and Catalan journalist from TV3, Albert Fabrega. Competitors were split into groups of four of different nationalities, with one team principal for each group.

The best drivers from each country then took on a team of Scuderia Ferrari drivers, featuring Fernando Alonso, Kimi Raikkonen, Jules Bianchi, a Scuderia test driver, on loan for the night from the Marussia F1 team, Marc Gene and Raffaele Marciello, a Ferrari Driver Academy student, in Hockenheim for round 6 of the GP2 series. The winner was decided by adding the points scored by the journalist to those of that nation’s allocated race driver, decided by a draw before the start of a race where the victory went to Fabrega.

(Source: ferrari.com)

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No penalty for Raikkonen crash

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The FIA has rejected claims that Kimi Raikkonen should have been punished for his crash in the British Grand Prix, and that the red flag delay was too long.

The Ferrari Formula 1 driver crashed heavily on the opening lap after he lost control of his car as he rejoined the track on the Wellington Straight.

Article 20.2 of F1’s Sporting Regulations states that: “Should a car leave the track the driver may rejoin, however, this may only be done when it is safe to do so and without gaining any lasting advantage.”

There have been suggestions that the fact Raikkonen crashed after rejoining the circuit means he should have been punished for what happened.

AUTOSPORT understands that while the FIA did look in to the incident, it decided that Raikkonen had not rejoined in an unsafe manner.

Telemetry data shows that, after leaving the track at 230 km/h, Raikkonen did scrub off some speed as he returned to the circuit, before his car was unsettled by a bump as it ran through a patch of grass.

Although the FIA accepted that Raikkonen would not have crashed if he had slowed down dramatically, it is understood the governing body believed that any other driver would have rejoined the track in the same manner.

Raikkonen’s impact with the crash barriers was registered at 160km/h, with a peak of 47G.

(Source: autosport.com)